Urgent Care Centres

What are urgent care centres?

Urgent care centres are an alternative to A&E. They are centres that treat minor injuries and illness that require urgent treatment that cannot be seen by your registered GP.

Where’s my nearest UCC?

For most people in Hammersmith and Fulham, the closest urgent care centre is based at Charing Cross Hospital or Hammersmith Hospital. They are staffed by experienced GPs and nurses, healthcare assistants and other healthcare practitioners.

What are urgent care centres?

Urgent care centres are an alternative to A&E. They are centres that treat minor injuries and illness that require urgent treatment that cannot be seen by your registered GP.

Where’s my nearest UCC?

For most people Southall, the closest urgent care centre is based at Ealing Hospital. They are staffed by experienced GPs and nurses, healthcare assistants and other healthcare practitioners.

 Ealing Hospital Uxbridge Road, Southall, Greater London, UB1 3HW  02089675000

 

Paediatrics A&E

Please be aware that the Ealing Hospital A&E cannot treat children. The below hospitals have Paediatrics A&E:

Hillingdon HospitaPield Heath Rd, Uxbridge,UB8 3NN 01895 238 282

West Middlesex University Hospital   Twickenham Rd, Isleworth TW7 6AF  02085602121

St Mary’s Hospital  Praed St, London W2 1NY  020 3312 6666

Northwick Park Hospital Watford Rd, Harrow, HA1 3UJ 02088643232

Chelsea and Westminste369 Fulham Road, London,SW10 9NH 02033158000

 

 Which conditions are treated at UCCs?

The urgent care centre treats minor injuries and illnesses that require urgent treatment.

  • minor illnesses
    • cuts and grazes
    • minor scalds and burns
    • strains and sprains
    • bites and stings
    • minor head injuries
    • ear and throat infections
    • minor skin infections / rashes
    • minor eye conditions / infections
    • stomach pains
    • suspected fractures

On arrival at the urgent care centre you will be assessed and treated in order of the priority of your condition.

This is an urgent care service and should only be used if you require urgent medical attention and cannot be seen by your registered GP.

  • If your condition is urgent and requires immediate attention, you will be seen by an appropriate clinician in the urgent care centre.
  • If your condition is not urgent or immediate, you will be referred back to your GP.
  • If you are seriously ill, you will be referred to the emergency department which is located next to the urgent care centre.

 

 Emergencies

A&E departments assess and treat patients with serious injuries or illnesses. You should visit A&E or call 999 for life-threatening emergencies, such as:

  • loss of consciousness
    • acute confused state and fits that are not stopping
    • persistent, severe chest pain
    • breathing difficulties
    • severe bleeding that cannot be stopped

If you need an ambulance call 999, the emergency phone number in the UK.

You can also dial 112, which is the ambulance number throughout the European Union.

Major A&E departments offer access 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, although not all hospitals have an A&E department.

 

Call 111 if you need medical help fast, but it’s not life-threatening. For example, if you;

  • Think you need to go to hospital
  • Don’t know who to call for medical help
  • Don’t have a GP to call
  • Need medical advice or reassurance about